Let’s go to the hop!

TurnbullPostCoWSeptember 6, 2014 – Martin Turnbull is the author of the enormously successful Garden of Allah novels, which were recently optioned for film and television. If you love Hollywood and/or Southern California history, you’ll surely savor his books. Each in the series is set in a different era in the Golden Age of Hollywood, and his attention to detail coupled with his charming style seduce the reader into a wonderful world of movie make believe. I first encountered Martin’s enchanting website, MartinTurnbull.com, while Googling for images of the interior of the Mocambo nightclub which is featured in my book. Then I started following and “liking” his terrific Hollywood-centric posts on Facebook, and before I knew it, he posted the above on my City of Whores page. Shortly thereafter, we struck up a very entertaining correspondence, and he’s been enormously generous with his knowledge of the world of indie publishing. To that end, he invited me to participate in a Blog Hop, which sounded more like a very awkward dance than an opportunity to promote my work, until he explained. To participate, I’m to answer four questions here on my own blog, then link to any other writer friends who’d like to join in. Martin graciously offered to link to my blog from his, MartinTurnbull.wordpress, so let’s get to it:

1. What are you working on/writing? I’m currently dividing my creative focus between two projects. One is my bread and butter day job: ongoing revisions to my Southern Gothic ghost story TV pilot which was optioned by TriStar Television. The other is my as yet untitled second novel, which is very different from City of Whores. Yes, the protagonist works in Hollywood, but as a television writer this time, and he’s dealing with some life-altering issues rooted in having grown up in the South of the 1960s—a time when bigotry and prejudice were more or less accepted as the norm. It’s a more reflective piece than Whores, and only autobiographical in a few of the specific details.

2. How does your work/writing differ from others in its genre? For a time, I was “type cast” as a “family dramedy” and “youth oriented” writer. I used to joke that I’d spent most of my adult life firmly stuck in high school while toiling away on shows like The Wonder Years, Party of Five, and One Tree Hill. Fortunately, as I matured, new opportunities presented themselves and I had such fun on the series Ghost Whisperer and Revenge. But I can’t really say my work differed “from others in its genre” because a television writer by nature has to be adaptable to the voices of their showrunner. My ghost story pilot opens up some new terrain for me, and will allow me to finally work in the horror genre which I’ve adored ever since racing home after school to watch the original Dark Shadows (and no, Johnny Depp and Tim Burton, I will never forgive you). In terms of my fiction, City of Whores is my debut novel, and while I say it’s about Hollywood in the 1950s, that’s just the high stakes and glamorous setting for an unconventional love story about one man’s journey toward redemption.

3. Why do you write what you do? Honestly, I write television because it’s usually gratifying, fun, and rewarding. I’ve always said that if you hate change, don’t go into TV because it’s a very nomadic lifestyle. I also crave instant gratification, and in television, sometimes what you’re writing today will be in front of the cameras as early as tomorrow, then all-prettied up and playing on your TV a very short while later. It’s also been an amazing training ground for developing characters, plot, and long story arcs. In fact, a season of a television show is rather like a novel in a series, each episode representing one chapter. With City of Whores, I mostly wanted to tell a dysfunctional love story. The fun part was setting it during the twilight of Tinseltown’s Golden Age, which allowed me to immerse myself in the Old Hollywood I’ve loved since falling under its spell as a child thanks to NBC Saturday Night at the Movies. For me, fiction writing is a form of time travel: things I never had a chance to experience—like the Mocambo or the 20th Century Fox back lot or the maiden voyage of the SS United States—could be brought to life through research and imagination. By putting my fictional characters in these extraordinary settings, I could live vicariously through them. As for why I’m writing my next novel, I can only quote the woman who penned my favorite book of all time: “Any writer worth his salt writes to please himself…It’s a self-exploratory operation that is endless. An exorcism of not necessarily his demon, but of his divine discontent.” – Harper Lee

4. How does your writing process work? Network television, where you’re usually writing and producing twenty-two episodes per season (which is really twenty-two forty-five minute films in ten months!) is exactly like Lucy and Ethel in the chocolate factory. Once the show starts production, that conveyor belt is rolling, and you only have a certain amount of time to make sure all those little gems are perfectly packaged. Some will be great, some you’ll stuff in your apron, and some you’ll eat. The process is fast and only seems to speed up as the season unfolds. There’s no time for writer’s block when you’re constantly running around with your hair on fire while feeding the ravenous beast. As for my fiction, I usually start by cleaning out a closet or some other task. Seriously. It isn’t about avoiding the work, it’s a chance to think about the story, the characters, and their world, without having to face that panic-enducing blinking cursor. I started Whores in 1994 as part of a writers’ group, and then put it away for many years while I was constantly working crazy hours on the various TV shows that have made up my career. But when I discovered those chapters and notes again—while cleaning out my file drawers, by the way—I realized that my characters and that world had been subconsciously percolating during all the ensuing years, so I eagerly dove back in. It was the most fun I’ve ever had writing anything, in no small part because it was so liberating. Gone were the voices in my head: no line producer screaming at me that there’s no way we could recreate the filming of a scene from the 1953 Barbara Stanwyck film Titanic; no actors arguing heatedly with me while refusing to say a crucial line of dialog; no director freaking out about the sheer number of scenes; no studio telling me my characters would have to travel on the Queen Mary because it’s right here in Long Beach. Fiction set my imagination free, and it was so exhilarating, I’m now an addict for life.

And that’s my story, and I’m sticking to it. Which brings us to…

One of the best things about working in television is the writers’ room. It’s my favorite part of the process—the camaraderie of other writers. Along the way, if you’re lucky, you even meet some keepers: fellow scribes who quickly become friends outside of the room and beyond the life of the show. For me, one of those keepers is the incredibly talented Ann Lewis Hamilton. Her delightful debut novel, Expecting, was just published in July. It’s simultaneously laugh-out-loud funny and incredibly poignant and moving. I devoured it. So now, as part of this here Blog Hop thingy, hoppity hop on over to the her very entertaining blog for bibliophiles, MyBookClubForOne. Stay tuned…

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